Core Stories

Life Isn't a Square Range

Change the Way You Think

SHOOTING AT LONGER DISTANCES HAS BECOME EXTREMELY POPULAR OVER THE LAST FEW YEARS.

While advancements in technology have made your equipment more accurate than ever before, the one thing technology can’t account for is you. Despite what you might have heard in the past, practice does not always make perfect. Spending time at the range trying to hone your skills is only as effective as the drills you’re running. So even though self-diagnosing issues is admirable, there’s no substitute for legitimate training. And no one challenges your shooting methods and effectiveness better than Buck Doyle.

With over 21 years in the US Marine Corps, deploying on multiple combat tours, serving as a Chief Instructor at the Special Missions Training Branch, and retiring as a Master Sergeant, Buck not only has the knowledge to elevate your shooting, but a unique teaching style that will help you change the way you think about training.

Practice for the Real World

A standard square range can help you with basic shooting fundamentals, but life isn’t a square range. Whether you’re shooting in a PRS-style match, a 3-gun event, or hunting in the backcountry, you’ll undoubtedly be faced with awkward shooting positions, an elevated heart rate, and lots of movement – all things you won’t encounter on your standard square range. Before you start pouring through your next case of ammo, determine which technique you’re trying to improve, then practice it like you are in a real-world scenario.

“I DON’T TEACH LONG RANGE; I TEACH GUN-FIGHTING AT DISTANCE.”

Buck Doyle

Put It To The Test

FIRING-HAND POSITION

Bring your thumb to the outside of the lower receiver when placing your hand on the pistol grip. This mitigates sympathetic movements, which can occur from over-gripping, pulse, and an elevated heart rate.

RUNNING WITH A GUN

Wrap all four fingers and thumb of the firing hand around the pistol grip like you would a bat. Do the same thing around the handguard with your non-firing hand. This technique maximizes safety and maneuverability when running through tight spaces or thick vegetation. Maintaining a vertical, muzzle-down weapon position also prevents muzzling other shooters.

PRONE

Ensure your body is directly behind the gun and place the butt of the stock between the center of your chest and shoulder pocket so your body can evenly absorb the recoil. Using a rear-bag between the ground and the bottom-rear portion of the stock to raise or lower your sight on target will alleviate any pulse from your non-firing hand. Load into the bi-pod (or the magazine if not using a bipod), making sure not to apply too much forward pressure.

BARRIERS

When shooting from barriers or cover, always apply marksmanship fundamentals. Load into the rifle for a more stable shooting position - push forward into the barrier/cover with the front of the magazine well, magazine, or bipod, using consistent and equal pressure.

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