FAQs

Service & Repair

  1. Where do I send my scope for service, repair, or Custom Shop modification? How long does this typically take?

Riflescopes & Reticles

  1. Can I have a Bullet Drop Compensation (BDC) dial made for my scope? What information do I need to provide and how much will it cost?
  2. Can I have the reticle in my scope changed to another style?
  3. What are the major differences between scope lines?
  4. My scope is running out of internal adjustment travel before I get properly sighted in. How can I obtain more travel?
  5. Can I have an existing scope refinished?
  6. What is the purpose of the dot above the crosshair on Leupold custom, ballistically matched reticles?
  7. When was my scope manufactured?
  8. Why does my BAS reticle (Boone & Crockett Big Game; Varmint Hunter’s; LR Duplex®; LRV Duplex; and Custom, Ballistically Matched reticles) need to be used on a specific magnification setting?
  9. What is the difference between a front focal plane (1st focal plane) reticle and a rear focal plane (2nd focal plane) reticle?

Rangefinders

  1. When using my RX® rangefinder, how do I turn modes on/off?
  2. Why does my rangefinder range inconsistently?
  3. Why does my rangefinder only return 4 dash/lines and no yardage?
  4. What ballistic group do I fall into since mine isn’t on the list?
  5. What qualifies as a reflective target?
  6. What does ‘weatherproof’ mean?
  7. What is the warranty of your rangefinders?

Binoculars

  1. Where are the binoculars made? Where is the serial number for my model bino?
  2. Are they waterproof?
  3. Are your binocular prisms phase coated?
  4. Do your binoculars have BAK4 prisms?
  5. Do your binoculars have a lifetime warranty?
  6. What does Synergy Built mean?
  7. Do you have any covers that fit better?
  8. How do you rate your binoculars? (Which models are better than the others?)
  9. Just what does the twilight factor number in the catalog mean?
  10. Which is the best Leupold binoculars for children?
  11. Can any of the Leupold spotting scopes be used for digiscoping?
  12. What are the advantages of roof prism and Porro prism binoculars?
  13. Which Leupold binoculars have low interpupillary distance capability?

Service & Repair

1. Where do I send my scope for service, repair, or Custom Shop modification? How long does this typically take?

When shipping product for warranty or service, please include a note of instruction, return address, telephone number, and e-mail address. If you are having a chargeable service performed (reticle change, target adjustment installation, replacement of damaged components, etc.), please do not include payment, you will be contacted by a Leupold representative. Please record the model and serial number of your product, and ship the optic only. Remove any mounts, rings, sunshades, or lens covers. It is recommended that you purchase insurance and retain a tracking number to document the arrival of your product. If you need any further assistance, please call our technical service department at 1-800-LEUPOLD or (503) 526-1400.

For shipment by UPS or Federal Express:
Leupold & Stevens, Inc.
Attn: Product Service Dept.
14400 NW Greenbrier Parkway
Beaverton, OR 97006

For shipment by mail:
Leupold & Stevens, Inc.
Attn: Product Service Dept.
P.O. Box 688
Beaverton, OR 97075

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Riflescopes & Reticles

1. Can I have a Bullet Drop Compensation (BDC) dial made for my scope? What information do I need to provide and how much will it cost?

We can create custom BDC dials for virtually any Leupold scope with the exceptions of the Rifleman, LPS, Competition, and BR lines. If the scope in question does not currently have tall, finger-adjustable adjustments (target style, M1, M2, or M3) currently installed, the scope will need to be sent to the Custom Shop for this addition. In most cases, we can only install target style or M1 style adjustments in scopes currently utilizing low-profile, hunting style adjustments.

The Custom Shop will need to know the cartridge being used, the exact bullet type and weight, the average elevation above sea level, and the average temperature in which you will be shooting. We understand elevation and temperature measurements can vary dramatically, even through the course of one day, so a simple average will work rather well. For best results, we recommend taking multiple chronograph measurements of exact muzzle velocity and setting the BDC dial for the average. If no chronograph is available, most factory loaded ammunition includes an estimated muzzle velocity.

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2. Can I have the reticle in my scope changed to another style?

The Leupold Custom Shop can install a variety of reticle offerings in virtually any Leupold scope; the only modern exception being the Rifleman line. Though the available offerings vary depending upon the exact scope, most scopes will accept most standard reticle offerings. Standard reticle offerings include:

  • Fine Duplex
  • Duplex
  • Heavy Duplex
  • Wide Duplex
  • Wide Duplex RE (Range Estimating)
  • CPC
  • Target Dot
  • Leupold Dot
  • Crosshair
  • German #1
  • German #4
  • Post & Duplex

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3. What are the major differences between scope lines?

With all of the recent changes, it can be difficult to know exactly how each product will perform. Every scope Leupold produces, including the Rifleman, is fully coated (all lenses, internal and external, are coated) and utilizes glass, coatings, and optical systems of equal or better quality than the discontinued Vari-X II’s of the past. Decreased cost associated with the Rifleman line is due to increased efficiency in our production process, not from reduced quality.

To make things easier, a brief summary of our current scope lines has been compiled including the most prominent features belonging to each.

It is important to note that every lens (internal and external) in every Leupold scope is coated, but the type of coatings will vary. Fully multicoated” indicates that each lens in an optical system is coated with multiple layers of lens coating, such as Multicoat 4. “Fully coated” indicates that each lens is coated with a single lens coating; Leupold uses magnesium fluoride. “Standard multicoated” scopes have a combination of coated lenses and multicoated lenses.

VX-7

  • New for 2007, the VX-7 line takes full advantage of Leupold’s 100 years of experience. The VX-7 uses ?-MOA SpeeDial adjustments which eliminate the possibility of losing adjustment covers. DiamondCoat 2 exterior lens coatings provide the highest level of scratch resistance ever offered. Xtended Twilight internal lens coatings work to optimize the wavelengths specific to twilight conditions, making the VX-7 the best low-light scope we’ve ever produced. The use of a 4-to-1 erector system provides a larger range of magnification, making this line the ultimate scope for serious hunters.

LPS

  • The LPS line uses ?-MOA, low-profile, finger-adjustable adjustments; a fast-focus eyepiece; and our DiamondCoat lens coatings to provide incredible light transmission values with the addition of remarkable scratch resistance.

VX-L®

  • The VX-L was new for 2006, and uses ?-MOA or 1/8-MOA adjustments depending upon model, has a fast-focus eyepiece, and utilizes an objective lens specially shaped to allow large objective scopes to be mounted in low rings. VX-L scopes use a combination of Index Matched and DiamondCoat lens coatings as well as edge-blackened lenses to produce extremely low glare and unprecedented light transmission values.

VX-III

  • The VX-III line was new for 2004, and uses ?-MOA, low-profile, finger-adjustable adjustments and a fast-focus eyepiece. VX-III’s are fully multicoated and Index Matched to ensure that each lens has the best possible coating, producing total light transmission values higher than ever seen before.

Mark 4

  • Beginning in 2004, all tactical scopes are included in the Mark 4 category and will have the same features as past tactical models with the addition of a fast-focus eyepiece and Index Matched lenses; there are two exceptions which include the CQ/T and 3-9x40mm PR. The CQ/T has always utilized a combination of DiamondCoat (external) and Multicoat 4 (internal) lens coatings, and the 3-9x40mm PR is fully multicoated using Multicoat 4. 2003 tactical scopes typically had fully multicoated lenses utilizing Multicoat 4.

Vari-X III

  • The Vari-X III line (discontinued for 2004 with introduction of VX-III) has seen little change and is still optically the same as those produced in the 90s. Vari-X III’s utilize ?-MOA click adjustments and are fully multicoated with Multicoat 4.

VX-II

  • The VX-II line (2003 and older) uses a combination of Vari-X III and Vari-X II (discontinued) technology. VX-II’s also utilize ?-MOA click adjustments, but the lens coatings are unique. The external lenses are coated with Multicoat 4 and the internal lenses are coated with magnesium fluoride.
  • Beginning in 2004, the VX-II line is fully multicoated and will perform comparably to the discontinued Vari-X III line.

VX-I

  • The VX-I also utilizes a combination of Vari-X III and Vari-X II technology, utilizing ?-MOA friction (non-clicking) adjustments. The external lenses are multicoated and the internal lenses use magnesium fluoride.

Rifleman

  • Though the Rifleman line of scopes uses a different maintube (for aesthetic reasons), it is optically the same as the Vari-X II (discontinued for 2001). The adjustments are exactly the same as the Vari-X II (?-MOA friction) as are the lenses and coatings. All lenses, internal and external, are coated with magnesium fluoride. Basically, the Rifleman is a newer-looking matte finish version of the Vari-X II that helped build the Leupold reputation. It is important to note that Custom Shop options (reticle changes, target adjustment installation, etc.) are not available for the Rifleman line of scopes.

Beginning in 2005, there were changes to the fixed magnification scope lines, updating them to follow the current convention used by the VX series of scopes; all fixed magnification scopes now have an “FX” designation followed by a number indicating the combination of technologies used in that product. For example, an FX-II will have the same lens coatings and adjustments as a VX-II, an FX-III will have the same lens coatings and adjustments as the VX-III line, etc.

There was also a shift from using the term “compact” to the term “ultralight,” meaning that the FX-II 2.5x20mm Ultralight which was introduced in 2005 will be a fixed magnification scope with ?-MOA click adjustments, fully multicoated lenses, and will have the compact eyepiece.

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4. My scope is running out of internal adjustment travel before I get properly sighted in. How can I obtain more travel?

When encountering an issue involving exhausted adjustment travel it is likely related to the alignment between the scope and barrel. When producing a firearm, there are many different components, each having a tolerance specification. As these tolerances “stack,” the alignment between the receiver and the barrel changes; this is why 10 seemingly identical rifles will all require different amounts of scope adjustment to sight-in. This is also why some scopes will reach the end of the adjustment travel without properly aligning to the bore; running out of adjustment before you can place the bullet in the center of the target.

This issue can be rather frustrating to the average rifleman who simply wants to sight-in and leave the adjustments in a single position, but to the long-range shooter who makes adjustments more often, the issue is compounded. People often want to know “how far can I shoot” with a particular scope, meaning how much elevation adjustment they will have for long-range shooting. This is not a question that can easily be answered because of the previously mention tolerance stack. As an example, let’s take 2 of the same 10 seemingly identical rifles mentioned earlier and see what happens when used for long-range shooting; both rifles are chambered in .308 Winchester, will be shooting 168 grain match-grade ammunition, and are mounted with scopes with having MOA of total adjustment travel (35-MOA up and 35-MOA down from center).

Due to differing tolerances, rifle #1 requires 10-MOA of down adjustment from the scope to be sighted in at 100 yards and rifle #2 requires 10-MOA of up adjustment. This means that the scope on rifle #1 will have 45-MOA of up adjustment remaining, allowing the shooter to make the proper correction for shots up to 1,070 yards; rifle #2 will have 25-MOA of up adjustment remaining, allowing the shooter to make the proper correction for shots up to 780 yards. Even though the rifles seem exactly the same, #2 will require a long range base or shims much sooner than rifle #1.

Elevation issues can be resolved by shimming. If more up adjustment is required, the rear of the base needs to be shimmed between the receiver and the base. If you need more down adjustment, the front base needs to be shimmed. In making this adjustment it should be noted each 0.001″ thickness of shim equates to approximately 1-MOA (1 inch at 100 yards) correction. Shimming does not induce stress on the scope, but typically reduces stress by properly leveling the scope to be parallel with the receiver.

If an issue exists on the windage axis, the correction needs to be made with windage adjustable bases or rings. Leupold offers windage adjustable bases (STD) which have two windage screws holding the rear ring. By loosening one side and tightening the other, they shift the rear of the scope right or left. It should be noted that shifting the rear of the scope to the left will cause the point of impact to shift to the left and vise versa. It should also be noted that if one axis is near the limit of its adjustment, there will be a reduction in the amount of adjustment on the other axis. If the elevation adjustment is near the top of the adjustment range, the windage adjustment will be reduced; if windage adjustment has been induced, there will be a reduction in elevation adjustment. This can be illustrated by drawing a circle on a piece of paper to represent the maintube of a scope. If you start in the center of the circle with your pencil, you can move an equal distance in any of the four directions: up, down, left, or right. If you start in the center of the circle and move upwards toward the top of the circle, you will see that the distance remaining to the left and right has been diminished. The same is true in any direction; if you start in the center of the circle and move to the left, you will have diminished travel to adjust up or down.

** It is not uncommon for lower quality optics to have more adjustment travel than their higher quality counterparts for a number of reasons, but is typically due to the use of smaller, less expensive internal components. When smaller parts are placed in the same size housing (maintube), they will have the ability to move farther, but will also have negative aspects relating to image quality and durability.

In the diagrams above, the outer circle represents the maintube of the scope when looking through the optic. The black dot represents the erector system, or internal lens cluster that is moved when making windage/elevation adjustments on the scope. The thin lines help illustrate the amount of travel remaining on the opposite axis as windage/elevation adjustments are made; helping illustrate how an adjustment in one direction limits the amount of travel in the other.

  • 1. Represents a scope with the erector system in the center of the adjustment travel range; allowing for maximum adjustment travel on the elevation axis (the same is true for windage when the erector system is centered).
  • 2. Represents a scope with the erector system in the center of the adjustment travel range; allowing for maximum adjustment travel on the windage axis (the same is true for elevation when the erector system is centered).
  • 3. Represents a scope with the erector system near the end of the available travel in the up direction; drastically reducing the amount of windage travel remaining.
  • 4. Represents a scope with the erector system near the end of the available travel in the left direction; drastically reducing the amount of elevation travel remaining.
  • 5. Represents the scope on rifle #1 in the above example; when sighted-in at 100 yards.
  • 6. Represents the scope on rifle #2 in the above example; when sighted-in at 100 yards.

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5. Can I have an existing scope refinished?

Unfortunately, we cannot refinish a scope, the external components must be replaced. To effectively remove scratches, dings, or ring marks, the affected area must be replaced. The most common request relates to ring marks; in these instances the Leupold Custom Shop can replace the maintube.

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6. What is the purpose of the dot above the crosshair on Leupold custom, ballistically matched reticles?

This dot can be used for range estimating purposes. Certain VX-III scopes offer a Duplex range estimating feature which allows the user to bracket a deer between the center intersection of the reticle and the top post (see your Leupold owner’s handbook for details). Leupold custom, ballistically matched reticles allow the user to estimate the distance to a deer (measuring 18″ from backbone to brisket) using the dot, or the distance to an elk (measuring 26″ from backbone to brisket) using the top heavy post.

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7. When was my scope manufactured?

Every Leupold scope produced since 1974 will have a letter included in the serial number acting as a date-code. Scopes using a letter as a prefix (the beginning of the serial number) were produced between 1974 and 1992. Scopes using a letter as a suffix (the end of the serial number) have been produced after 1992. On the chart below, you will notice the letters “I,” “O,” and “Q” have been omitted as they are easily mistaken for “1,” “0,” and “0” respectively.

PrefixSuffix
E = 1974A = 1993
F = 1975B = 1994
G = 1976C = 1995
H = 1977D = 1996
J = 1978E = 1997
K = 1979F = 1998
L = 1980G = 1999
M = 1981H = 2000
N = 1982J = 2001
P = 1983K = 2002
R = 1984L = 2003
S = 1985M = 2004
T = 1986N = 2005
U = 1987P = 2006
V = 1988R = 2007
W = 1989
X = 1990
Y = 1991
Z = 1992

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8. Why does my BAS reticle (Boone & Crockett Big Game; Varmint Hunter’s; LR Duplex; LRV Duplex; and Custom, Ballistically Matched reticles) need to be used on a specific magnification setting?

Leupold Ballistics Aiming System reticles such as the Boone & Crockett Big Game; Varmint Hunter’s; LR Duplex; LRV Duplex; or the Custom, Ballistically Matched reticles are typically installed in scopes with a rear focal plane design; allowing the user to “tune” the reticle for use with multiple loads. As discussed in question 11, changing the magnification in rear focal plane designs changes the subtension of the reticle, effectively changing the amount of holdover provided by the long-range aim points of these reticles. This can be observed by placing the main aim point (crosshair) in the center of a target, changing the magnification, and observing the resulting effect on subtension. The observer will notice that though the main aim point remains in the center of the target, the holdover points appear to move “up” the target as magnification increases, and “down” the target as magnification decreases. As such, faster loads with flatter trajectories will require a higher magnification setting than slower loads with more bullet drop. It is important to note that since the main aim point is located directly in the center of the field, it does not move as the magnification changes; this allows users of these reticles to sight-in on any magnification setting.

One example commonly used to help visualize this effect involves viewing a deer 400 yards away with a fictitious scope ranging from 1x to 100x. If the scope is set to 1x magnification and the main aim point is placed directly on his shoulder, the deer appears rather small and occupies very little of the visual field. Because the deer appears small and only occupies the very center of the field, the 400-yard aim point is located well below the deer, representing many feet of drop. As the magnification is increased, the main aim point remains on the deer’s shoulder, but he begins to fill more of the visual field. When 100x is reached his shoulder fills the entire visual field, placing the 400-yard aim point only inches below the main aim point. The result is that as magnification is increased, the target begins to fill more of the visual field, making the holdover points appear to “walk” up the target, thus representing less drop. As magnification is decreased, the target gets smaller, making the holdover points appear to “walk” down the target, thus representing more drop.

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9. What is the difference between a front focal plane (1st focal plane) reticle and a rear focal plane (2nd focal plane) reticle?

Most riflescopes utilize a rear focal plane reticle design, creating a situation where the apparent size of the reticle does not change as the magnification is adjusted. In these scopes, the amount of target area covered by the reticle is inversely proportional to magnification; as the magnification is increased, the amount of target area covered by the reticle is decreased. This can be seen by looking through a variable magnification scope and increasing the magnification setting. As the power is increased, the apparent size of the target is increased, but the reticle appears to remain the same size; the result is that the reticle covers less of the target when the magnification is increased.

Rear Focal Plane Reticles – In general, hunting scopes are designed with rear focal plane reticles; this allows the reticle to appear bolder and heavier when set to low magnification, but appear thinner and more precise when set to high magnification. Most hunters set variable magnification scopes to a mid-level magnification for general carry situations, reducing magnification in low-light or heavy cover situations, and increasing magnification for longer, more precise shooting solutions. Rear focal plane designs allow the reticle to appear bolder in low light, making them easy to see and faster to acquire when the light is fading. This same property is advantageous in situations where heavy cover may be encountered, allowing easy differentiation between the reticle and vegetation. If a longer distance shot is to be taken, the magnification can be increased, creating a situation where the reticle covers less of the target, allowing the user to be more precise. If a front focal design were used, hunters would notice that in low-light or heavy-cover situations, the reticle would become much smaller and more difficult to see on low magnification; right when they need the reticle to be bold and easy to acquire.

Front Focal Plane Reticles – Many tactical groups prefer front focal plane designs because common tactical reticles serve a dual purpose: a point of aim and a means of measurement. Reticles such as a mil dot are based on a specific subtension and require exact feature spacing to be accurate; if this type of reticle is used in a rear focal plane design, the scope must be used on a single, specific magnification (typically high power). Placing this type of reticle in a front focal plane design allows the operator to use the scope on any magnification while retaining the exact spacing of the reticle features.

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Rangefinders

1. When using my RX® rangefinder, how do I turn modes on/off?

Rangefinder Buttons –

  • RX-I and RX-II models have two buttons. The Power/Set button is located on top of the rangefinder, and the Mode button is located on the left side of the rangefinder.
  • RX-III and RX-IV models have three buttons, all located on the top of the rangefinder. The Power button is closest to the user’s eye and is the largest. The Mode button is located in the middle of the three buttons. The Set button is farthest from the user’s eye.
  • The Power button is used to activate the rangefinder, as well as actuate the laser (obtain a return). All Leupold rangefinders shut off after a brief period, saving battery life and menu changes that may have been made.
  • The Mode button is used to enter and to navigate through the Quick Set Rotary Menu. Pressing the button initially enters the menu, each subsequent depression advances to the next available icon.
  • The Set button is used to turn the highlighted icon (in the Quick Set Rotary Menu) on or off. Each time the Set button is pressed, the selected icon toggles from off to on or vice versa. If the Set button is held depressed prior to entering the Quick Set Rotary Menu, the backlight (RX-III and RX-IV only) will illuminate until the button is released.

Activating a mode – The Mode button is used to enter, and advance through, the Quick Set Rotary Menu. The Set button is used to toggle each menu option on/off. To activate a mode, press the Mode button until the appropriate icon is flashing, then press the Set button. If the icon is displayed steadily, the mode is turned “on.”

Deactivating a mode – The Mode button is used to enter, and advance through, the Quick Set Rotary Menu. The Set button is used to toggle each menu option on/off. To turn a mode “off” press the Mode button until the appropriate icon is flashing, press the Set button until the icon is displayed steadily, then press the Set button again until the icon resumes flashing. It is important to note that as the user navigates through the Quick Set Rotary Menu, each icon will flash to show their current position in the menu. This initial flashing of the icon is only intended to show currently location in the menu and does not indicate the status of that mode (on or off). To make sure a mode is turned off, it should be turned on, then off; this will require pressing Mode until the icon is flashing (showing the user’s current location in the menu), pressing Set to turn the mode “on” (the icon will display steadily), then pressing Set again to turn the mode “off” (the icon will begin flashing again). This can be a bit confusing as the icon will flash initially to show the user’s location in the rotary menu, then it will display steadily to show the mode has been activated, then will flash again to indicate the mode has been deactivated. Flashing serves a dual-purpose, it initially acts as a place holder in the menu, then it acts to indicate a deactivated (turned off) mode.

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2. Why does my rangefinder range inconsistently?

Rangefinders can provide different ranges for a number of readings. Most center around the settings of the unit. For Gen 1 type products (RX-I, RX-II, RX-III, RX-IV) there are a number of settings that could provide different ranges based on conditions. 2nd (RX-600, RX-750, RX-1000) and 3rd (RX-1000i with DNA) generation rangefinders are also discussed below.

  • First Target – A “setting” that forces the rangefinder to respond with the first range that it detects. If there is a blade of grass or a small twig from a tree stand, you could be getting a reading different from you expectations.
  • Last Target – A “setting” that is also available in all rangefinders that helps you “look through” close in targets to provide a range on that last visible target for the rangefinder. Please note that the laser coming out of the unit is very small in diameter and might be obstructed on small targets in front of you (if you are unable to see a distance farther away).
  • >150 – A mode that will only return ranges past 150 yards. This feature is so you can range out of cover of thick grass or through a tree canopy. If you are ranging a target <150 yards, you will get no range.

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3. Why does my rangefinder only return 4 dash/lines and no yardage?

There would be two reasons to see 4 dashed lines in a Leupold rangefinder “—-”. The target is too close, or too far. Rangefinders vary on how close they can range a target. The RX-600 and RX-750 series will range down to 5 yards. The RX-1000 will range as little as 10 yards. The max distance will vary on conditions and target.

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4. What ballistic group do I fall into since mine isn’t on the list?

If your bullet is not on the list, the best option is to pick a group with similar performance, or read the instructions on the 500 yard test. The quick reference card will group the bullet’s impact on a 500 yard shot. Take practice shots, measure your drop, and select the appropriate group.

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5. What qualifies as a reflective target?

The rangefinder emits pulses of light. These pulses of light “reflect” or bounce off the target and get measured back at the rangefinder. Light will “reflect” off any target, but “shinier” and “flatter” surfaces will be more reflective and targets that columnate light (road signs, etc) will reflect the farthest. Dark and porous targets will absorb the most light and be challenged to range long distances. Many people think rocks are reflective, but most rocks are very porous and have a low “reflectivity.”

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6. What does ‘weatherproof’ mean?

Leupold invented the concept of “waterproof” with its riflescopes. Our riflescopes have been found submerged after decades to be removed and work the same as the day it was manufactured. For this reason, we are reluctant to call our rangefinders “waterproof.” We classify the rangefinder as water resistant because if submerged for long periods of time, the rangefinder will take on moisture. The rangefinder is guaranteed to take anything you can throw at it in the woods. If the rangefinder is dropped in a creek and then removed, it will be fine. If you have it in a pocket during a rain shower, it will be fine. We like to call the rangefinders as waterproof as human’s are.

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7. What is the warranty of your rangefinders?

Warranty varies by unit. Like all electronic products, failure is an inherent possibility. We take pride in the quality of our rangefinders and offer an industry leading warranty, two year warranty on our RX-1000, GX-3, GX-4 platform. The balance of our rangefinder products offer a 1 year warranty.

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Binoculars

1. Where are the binoculars made? Where is the serial number for my model bino?

Country of origin and serial number location is generally located near the hinge on the reverse side of the product. There are a few models w/ serial #’s located on the tripod mount cap.

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2. Are they waterproof?

All of our binocular and spotting scope models are designed to be both, waterproof and fogproof.

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3. Are your binocular prisms phase coated?

All roof prism Leupold binoculars are phase coated. Our Redfield roof prism binoculars are not phase coated. Traditional design porro prism binoculars do not require phase coating.

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4. Do your binoculars have BAK4 prisms?

All of our Leupold and Redfield binoculars utilize BAK4 prisms.

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5. Do your binoculars have a lifetime warranty?

Imported binoculars and spotting scopes are covered by our Leupold Limited Lifetime warranty. “Limited” means they are warranted to the original purchaser.

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6. What does Synergy Built mean?

The Synergy Built project represents a combined redesign effort from a dedicated team of professionals at our Leupold headquarters in Beaverton, Oregon. This collection of professionals has worked extensively on a total re-creation of our Observation products involving: Optical Engineering, Design Engineering, Mechanical Engineering, Manufacturing Engineering, and Quality Assurance Testing. The results are a line of binoculars and spotting scopes that is unlike any other in the industry.

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7. Do you have any covers that fit better?

As we redesign our products under the SYNERGY BUILT project, we have added tethered objective covers and quick detachable neoprene neck straps, along w/ many other upgraded features.

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8. How do you rate your binoculars? (Which models are better than the others?)

Similar to our riflescope product line of VX-1, VX-2, VX-3, etc; we have redesigned the features and performance of our binocular and spotting scope product lines align w/ riflescopes regarding the different levels of glass quality, internal lens coatings, external lens coatings, etc. Our entry level products are labeled as BX-1 for binoculars and SX-1 for spotting scopes; mid level products are labeled as BX-2 and SX-2, High level products are labeled as BX-3; our premium level “made in USA” products will include our familiar “golden ring”.

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9. Just what does the twilight factor number in the catalog mean?

The twilight factor is calculated by taking the square root of the magnification and the objective aperture size. The higher the twilight factor, the better the resolution of the binocular when observing under dim light conditions. One thing to remember, since this is a mathematical calculation, it does not take into consideration the light transmittance or quality of the optical system.

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10. Which is the best Leupold binoculars for children?

The Yosemite is the best choice because of its lower magnification; wide field of view; compact, but easy-to-use size; and wide interpupilary distance adjustment range.

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11. Can any of the Leupold spotting scopes be used for digiscoping?

Yes, the Golden Ring 12-40x60mm spotting scope can be used with the digital camera adapter for digiscoping.

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12. What are the advantages of roof prism and Porro prism binoculars?

Roof prism binoculars are lighter and have a closer focus distance. Roof prism binoculars also have a more stream-lined design. Porro prism binoculars often cost less than roof prism binoculars and can provide better depth perception.

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13. Which Leupold binoculars have low interpupillary distance capability?

The Yosemite IPD range spans from 50-70 millimeters, which is suitable for anyone. In addition, the Golden Ring binoculars (8x32mm, 10x32mm, 8x42mm, 10x42mm) have a range of 56-72 mm, and the Katmai from 57-72 mm.

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